Understanding Gaze Maps


Gaze maps provide different insights to heat maps and opacity maps. Gaze maps show what people are predicted to see during primary visual attention, whereas heat maps and opacity maps show the overall areas of attention during the first few seconds. For best results, always compare gaze maps with areas of interest to understand the bigger picture.


Gaze maps show where people are looking during primary visual attention, ie: the first 1.0-1.5 seconds of viewing an image.

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Example: Storefront windows

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This gaze map analysis shows that primary visual attention (ie: the first 1.0-1.5 seconds) is captured by the left-hand window and the in-store poster. Subsequent visual attention is then captured by the right-hand window.


Example: Merchandising display

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This gaze map analysis shows that primary visual attention (ie: the first 1.0-1.5 seconds) is captured by the high-contrast content on the central video screen and the high-contrast header panel. Subsequent visual attention is then captured by product packaging and the merchandising fixtures.


Example: Supermarket shelf

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This gaze map analysis shows that primary visual attention (ie: the first 1.0-1.5 seconds) is captured mainly by the Tropicana packaging with its high-contrast colours, oversized lettering, and clever use of white space. Subsequent visual attention is then captured by the rest of the products on the shelves.


Example: Product packaging

This gaze map analysis shows that primary visual attention (ie: the first 1.0-1.5 seconds) is captured by the high-contrast copy on both packaging designs.